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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 10
KRCB (PBS) 9
CSPAN2 6
KQEH (PBS) 5
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
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English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
believed to give back to society like andrew carnegie. did she donates her money to public service? >> she never did it publicly. of she would not let any suggestion that she had better sun and others have said there were plenty of places and people she gave to. she felt she was hounded constantly getting letters. she tried to keep it as quiet as possible. there is no proof. because other people said it at the time, one very close friend of hers who was a greek catholic philanthropist, and she became, i think she got hetty to give some money to the church. >> how hard was this to research? >> it was difficult. no diaries, know journals, she wanted no trace of her signature. she was afraid, she was accused in the lawsuit with her aunt's estate of forging her aunt's signatures she was always afraid somebody before rehearsing mitscher. stage with her signature. there were constantly stories of interviews with her and interestingly enough headlines were negative but reporters to spend time with her appreciated her, admired her and enjoy her company. that was rewarding. the stories were syndica
i'm in the midst of writing another book about andrew carnegie and she said when are you going to be finished? we can't say no to the kennedy fisa i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. i don't know if any of you grew up in new york or listened to don imus. he had a kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this and so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second or third time i realized it wasn't an impersonator, it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i and his two dogs have lunch together on monday since the dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session and they could of rome and play. was a weird sight, believe me. we were brought into the tiny little conference room, the two dogs, the senator and me with a card table in the middle, and the senator who was always on a diet. he would feel better the center he was head the biggest sa
well, i'm in the mid-of writing another book by andrew carnegie. she said when he went to to be finished? you can't say no to a kennedy. i said i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day, we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. i don't know if nav corp. in new york or listen to don imus. he had a ted kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this. so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second and third time, i realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggl
andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy carnegie.org. op >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions an foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioni sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ed
. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is bbc world news. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news. >> this is bbc world news america are reporting from washington. syrian rebels have take
created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a gunman at a school, mass casualties, and emergency crews-- the scene was eerily familiar and, once again, horrifying. this time, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the 27 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of
what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdrew her name. she'd faced republican criticisms over the benghazi terrorist attack. president obama made the announcement this afternoon at the white house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american
andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. president obama urges house speaker john boehner to take his deal on the fiscal cliff, calling it something republicans can be proud of. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. the c.e.o. of manufacturer johnson controls says business is looking good for 2013, but going over the fiscal cliff could change that. >> tom: and the u.s. treasury speeds up plans to sell its stake in general motors. is the automaker ready to stand alone? >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: under the threat of a white house veto, the u.s. house
corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax break force the middl
of industrial revolution. and there's a line from andrew carnegie which is very, very similar. so carnegie said this talent for, that this talent for organization in management is rare among men, is proved by the fact that it invariably secures enormous rewards for its possessor, no matter where or under what conditions. if a man is not an old dark, something -- oligarch, something is wrong with them. the man who whose service can be as partner is not only the first consideration, but such as render the question of his capital scarcely worth considering. doesn't matter how much money you have to start out with. for such men soon create capital. and in the hands of those without the special talent required, capital soon takes wings. so there's kind of a royal jelly element to it. interestingly, sort of given that, given this sort of sense of being self-made, this, you know, very hard working kind of alpha-geek condition, you might imagine that that would create sort of closer ties, greater sympathy with the rest of us. what i found is in many ways i think it creates a greater distance. and a few
for such a biography. and i said, well, i'm in the midst of writing another book. i'm writing a book about andrew carnegie. she said, when are you going to be finished? you can't say no to a kennedy. [laughter] i said, i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day -- [laughter] we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. [laughter] i don't know if any of of you grew up in new york or listened to don imus, "imus in the morning." he had a ted kennedy impersonator, and it sounded just like this. so i listened to the message, and of after listening to it the second or third time, i realized it was not an impersonator, it was the senate asking me to come -- the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington, and the senator and i and his two dogs had lunch together. on mondays his dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session, and they could roam, yeah, play in the senate. it was a weird sight, believe me. [laughter] we were brought into a tiny little conference ro
out andrew carnegie when he put together us steel in 1901, for $480 million, which carnegie personally got half, so $240 million in 1901. morgan didn't put up that money himself, obviously. he organized a syndicate to do it. john d. rockefeller, in 1913, when morgan died, was already worth almost a billion 1913 dollars. and this is an apocryphal story, but i have to tell it, anyway, because it's too good. supposedly, when morgan died, rockefeller read about his net worth in the new york times, of $80 million, shook his head and said, 'and to think he wasn't even a rich man. ' c-span: where was he born? >> guest: hartford, connecticut, 1837. c-span: what were his parents like? >> guest: his father was a very successful merchant, junius spencer morgan, who worked in hartford and then boston, and then moved to london in 1854 to become an anglo-american merchant banker. and he and pierpont, basically, were funneling european capital to the emerging american economy. i mean, we really were the emerging economy in the 19th century. he was very conservative, very upright, very much concerned
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)